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Citation for Introduction

Citation styles are based on the Chicago Manual of Style, 15th Ed., and the MLA Style Manual, 2nd Ed..

MLA

Brooke, George J. . "Additions to Daniel." In The Oxford Bible Commentary. Oxford Biblical Studies Online. Dec 3, 2021. <http://www.oxfordbiblicalcstudies.com/article/book/obso-9780198755005/obso-9780198755005-chapterFrontMatter-43>.

Chicago

Brooke, George J. . "Additions to Daniel." In The Oxford Bible Commentary. Oxford Biblical Studies Online, http://www.oxfordbiblicalcstudies.com/article/book/obso-9780198755005/obso-9780198755005-chapterFrontMatter-43 (accessed Dec 3, 2021).

Additions to Daniel - Introduction

The book of Daniel in the HB is composite; not only is it written in two languages (Hebrew and Aramaic), but its contents fall into two parts, one containing stories about Daniel as the wise man in the court of the foreign king, the other his visions. The scrolls from Qumran have shown that there were other traditions in the Second Temple period which are most suitably associated with Daniel (4Q242–6; 4Q551–3); notably 4Q242 seems to be an alternative form of Dan 4 . It is not altogether surprising that the Greek versions of Daniel contain additions. All three additions are set in Babylon and concern in some way the deliverance of the faithful. For further detail on matters of background see the survey by C. A. Moore (1992 ).

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