We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more
Select Bible Use this Lookup to open a specific Bible and passage. Start here to select a Bible.
Make selected Bible the default for Lookup tool.
Book: Ch.V. Select book from A-Z list, enter chapter and verse number, and click "Go."
:
OR
  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result

Hezekiah

Source:
The Oxford Companion to the Bible What is This? Provides authoritative interpretive entries on Biblical people, places, beliefs, events, and secular influences.

    Hezekiah

    (“Yah[weh] strengthens”). King of Judah (“the finest”: 2 Kings 18.5) 715–698 (or 727–686) BCE. Like his later successor Josiah, while young he worked closely with the priesthood (2 Chron. 29.2–4) and sought unification with the northern kingdom of Israel (left kingless), inviting the northern tribes to an ecumenical Passover (2 Chron. 30.1, perhaps a midrashic embroidering of his reforms summarized in 2 Kings 18.4). At first he paid tribute to Assyria, remaining submissive until 705; but apparently as part of his revolt (2 Kings 18.7; 20.12) he set about fortifying Jerusalem (2 Chron. 32.5). The year of Sennacherib's punitive invasion (see Lachish), Hezekiah's fourteenth year in 2 Kings 18.14, was 701, whence the beginning of his reign in 715, a date incompatible with 2 Kings 18.10, in which his sixth year was that of the fall of Samaria in 722 (whence the inauguration date of 727). Assyria's general (Isa. 36.4) appealed to Jerusalem's populace in their own language over the king's head; but trouble in the army (perhaps a plague: see 2 Kings 19.35) forced Sennacherib's sudden withdrawal. A second Assyrian campaign has been proposed on the basis of 2 Kings 18.17–19.36 (duplicating 18.13–16), to collect the immense sum Sennacherib claimed from Judah (2 Kings 18.14); but Isaiah may have induced Hezekiah just to send off the money and end his years in peace (2 Kings 20.19).

    Robert North

    • Previous Result
    • Results
    • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
    • Highlight On / Off
    • Next Result
    Oxford University Press

    © 2021. All Rights Reserved. Cookie Policy | Privacy Policy | Legal Notice