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The Jewish Study Bible Contextualizes the Hebrew Bible with accompanying scholarly text on Jewish traditions and history.

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Commentary on Psalms

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Ps. 24 :

A liturgy on entering the sanctuary. A hymn celebrating God, creator and victor, with an “entrance liturgy” (vv. 3–6; Pss. 5; 15 ). After an introduction celebrating God as the creator, the psalm has two parts; in the first (vv. 3–6 ), pilgrims enter the Temple, and in the second (vv. 7–10 ), the Ark enters. The two are separated by “Selah.” Each part has rhetorical questions and their answers; perhaps they were recited antiphonally. The psalm is used in Jewish liturgy on festivals, when the Torah is returned to the Ark.

1–2 :

God tamed the primeval waters and founded the earth upon them (Ps. 136.6 ); He is therefore to be acknowledged as the supreme sovereign of the world. The Temple is a microcosm of the world (cf. Gen. 2.1–3; Exod. 39.32, 42–43 ) and thus God's act of creation forms an appropriate introduction to this Temple liturgy.

3–6 :

The requirements for participation in Temple worship are predominantly moral, signifying obedience to God; see Ps. 15.2–5 .

3 :

The mountain of the Lord: The Temple mount, with an echo of Mt. Sinai.

6 :

Jacob: Israel, the congregation present at the ceremony. Selah (also v. 10 ), see Ps. 3.3 n.

7–10 :

God, as it were, enters the Temple. The Temple gates open for the Ark, symbolizing God's presence, to enter. The gates “lift up their heads,” a metaphoric expression for joyously welcoming God, pictured as a victorious king returning home to his palace.

10 :

The Lord of hosts, a relatively infrequent divine epithet in Psalms, emphasizes God's role in leading the heavenly hosts in battle, and is associated with the Ark, which could precede Israel in battle (see 1 Sam. ch 4 ). A plausible setting for the psalm might be the return from battle of the Ark, a symbol of (v. 8 ) “the LORD, mighty and valiant, the LORD, valiant in battle.”

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