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The Jewish Study Bible Contextualizes the Hebrew Bible with accompanying scholarly text on Jewish traditions and history.

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Commentary on Psalms

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Ps. 131 :

Like the previous psalm, this too starts in the singular (vv. 1–2 ) and moves to concerns about the community (v. 3 ); in fact, the last vv. of these two psalms share the phrase, “O Israel, wait for the LORD.”

1 :

An initial protestation of innocence (see Pss. 7; 17; 26 ). The psalmist claims to be “lowly,” an ideal in Psalms (e.g., 10.17 ). As such, he does not aspire to great things, or what is beyond; these are, as Radak notes, “divine concerns” (e.g., Pss. 86.10; 136.4; Job 5.9 ).

2 :

Once weaned, the child can no longer depend on its mother for its milk. Only here in Psalms is God viewed as a mother, though this image is found elsewhere in the Bible (e.g., Isa. 49.14–16 ).

3 :

See 130.7; 121.8; 125.2 .

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