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The Oxford Study Bible Study Bible supplemented with commentary from scholars of various religions.

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Commentary on Malachi

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1.1 : Title.

Malachi means “my messenger” or “my angel,” and is probably not a proper name (compare 3.1 ).

1.2–3.12 : Religious decline and hope for recovery.

1.2–5 : The LORD's hatred of Esau.

The Edomites were descended from Esau, the Israelites from Jacob. They were brother nations, but their relations were dominated by hostility. See Gen. 25.19–23, Ezek. ch. 35 , and Obad.

1.6–2.9 : Against priests.

Care for the details of sacrifice and ritual is a way to honour the LORD.

11 :

In contrast to the impurity of worship in Judah, the LORD is worshiped in purity by all the Gentile nations. See, too, v. 14 .

12 :

Profane: to treat an object set aside for worship as if it were a matter of secular business, subject to scheming and bargaining.

2.1–2 :

The business of priests is to convey God's blessings to people; dishonorable priests will have their blessings turned into curses that will fall upon themselves.

3 :

Contact with offal made one unfit for worship; here the blemished sacrifices do the same ( 1.13 ).

4 :

Levi was the priestly tribe, and the covenant acknowledged Levi's priestly functions.

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