We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more
Select Bible Use this Lookup to open a specific Bible and passage. Start here to select a Bible.
Make selected Bible the default for Lookup tool.
Book: Ch.V. Select book from A-Z list, enter chapter and verse number, and click "Go."
:
OR
  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result

The Oxford Study Bible Study Bible supplemented with commentary from scholars of various religions.

Related Content

Commentary on Genesis

Previous
Jump to: Select book from A-Z list, enter chapter and verse number, and click "Go."
Next
Text Commentary side-by-side

1.1–2.3 : The creation account,

composed by priests. Order evolves from chaos by divine command, followed by God's resting, in example, on the sabbath.

1 :

That creation arose out of nothing — that is, not out of materials at hand — became the usual understanding of this verse; see 2 Macc. 7.28 .

2 :

Spirit: the Heb. word also means “wind” or “breath.” In Mesopotamian myth, wind was an instrument for destroying the watery deep. Genesis 1, by contrast, does not depict a battle between God and chaos.

5 :

Evening … morning: day began at sundown and hence the order given here.

6 :

Vault: a solid dome (Job 37.18 ), retaining the upper waters whence the rains come (Gen. 7.11–12 ).

14 :

Lights: Israel's neighbors regarded the celestial bodies as deities (see Deut. 4.19 ). Here, they are results of God's creation.

26 :

The plural us ( 3.22; 11.7 ) may be a majestic plural, or else refer to the minor divine beings thought to surround God, like courtiers of a human king (1 Kgs. 22.19–22; Job 1.6 ). Image: in non-Israelite texts often refers to statues and other concrete representations of kings and deities. Its meaning here is not precisely stated.

28 :

To subdue the earth is to be free from nature's tyranny and from idolizing mere objects.

  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result
Oxford University Press

© 2014. All Rights Reserved. Privacy policy and legal notice