We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more
Select Bible Use this Lookup to open a specific Bible and passage. Start here to select a Bible.
Make selected Bible the default for Lookup tool.
Book: Ch.V. Select book from A-Z list, enter chapter and verse number, and click "Go."
:
OR
  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result

The New Oxford Annotated Bible New Revised Standard Study Bible that provides essential scholarship and guidance for Bible readers.

Related Content

Commentary on Joshua

Previous
Jump to: Select book from A-Z list, enter chapter and verse number, and click "Go."
Next
Text Commentary side-by-side

1.1–5.12 : Preparation for the conquest.

1.1–18 : The commission.

1 :

Moses' death (Deut 34 ) provides the setting for Joshua's commission. God did not allow Moses to enter the land (Deut 32.48–52 ).

2–18 :

The commission itself contains four speeches (vv. 2–9, 10–11, 12–15, 16–18 ).

2–9 :

The LORD's speech outlines the means of success for Joshua and the Israelites: obedience to the book of the law. The LORD's speech also anticipates the main themes of the book: the crossing of the Jordan ( 1.1–5.12 ), the conquest ( 5.13–12.24 ), the distribution of the land ( 13.1–22.34 ), and obedience to the law of Moses ( 23.1–24.33 ).

2–5 :

The idealized boundaries of the land, given with the assurance of God's presence, were the Jordan River to the east, the wilderness or semidesert to the south and east, the Lebanon mountain range to the northwest, the river Euphrates to the north, and the Great Sea, the Mediterranean Sea, to the west (cf. Deut 11.24–25 ).

4 :

All the land of the Hittites is likely a later gloss, probably referring to northern Syria.

5 :

An explicit recognition that Joshua is the new Moses; cf. Ex 3.12 .

6–9 :

As currently formulated, the text emphasizes that military success comes from the law's internalization, spoken of in 1.8 in terms of meditation with consequent obedience (cf. Deut 31.7–8; Ps 1.2–3 ).

11 :

In three days reflects ritual concerns (cf. Ex 3.18; 19.11 ).

12–15 :

Joshua's speech to the Transjordanian tribes is suffused with vocabulary that typifies Deuteronomy. Since the other tribes had helped the Transjordanians conquer their land, the Transjordanians were to help the other Israelites acquire their land west of the Jordan. The half‐tribe of Manasseh, according to territorial lists (see 13.29–31; 17 ) part of Manasseh occupied land east of the Jordan and part west.

13 :

See Deut 3.12–20 .

16–18 :

The reply of the Transjordanian tribes rounds out the chapters by echoing the LORD's assurances of 1.1–9 (cf. Deut 9–10 ).

  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result
Oxford University Press

© 2015. All Rights Reserved. Privacy policy and legal notice