We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more
Select Bible Use this Lookup to open a specific Bible and passage. Start here to select a Bible.
Make selected Bible the default for Lookup tool.
Book: Ch.V. Select book from A-Z list, enter chapter and verse number, and click "Go."
:
OR
  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result

The New Oxford Annotated Bible New Revised Standard Study Bible that provides essential scholarship and guidance for Bible readers.

Related Content

Commentary on Judith

Previous
Jump to: Select book from A-Z list, enter chapter and verse number, and click "Go."
Next
Text Commentary side-by-side

1.1–6 : Nebuchadnezzar is introduced. He declares war on Arphaxad, the king of Media.

1 :

Nebuchadnezzar (605–562 BCE) was the second and best‐known ruler of the Neo‐Babylonian empire (not over the Assyrians), ruling from Babylon (not Nineveh, the Assyrian capital that had been destroyed in 612). He destroyed Jerusalem in 586 and deported the Jews into Babylonian exile (2 Kings 24–25 ). The author of the book of Judith instead presents him as flourishing after the exile ( 4.3; 5.19 ). Some scholars believe that the historical inaccuracies of the book are deliberate attempts to present this story unquestionably as fiction. Arphaxad is unknown, as are many persons and places in this book. (Only those historically identifiable will be described in these notes.) Ecbatana, in the northwest part of modern Iran, was the capital of the empire of the Medes (Ezra 6.2; Tob 3.7 ).

2 :

A cubit was about 45 cm (18 in) long.

5 :

Ragau, the Median region where Arphaxad is killed (v. 15 ), is about 300 km (185 mi) northeast of Ecbatana, near modern Teheran.

6 :

Euphrates, Tigris, the principal rivers of Mesopotamia. Hydaspes, a river in India, but here evidently placed in Mesopotamia. Elymeans, possibly the inhabitants of Elyma, a Persian district. Chaldeans, Neo‐Babylonians (see v. 1n. ).

1.7–11 : The Persians and the western nations disregard Nebuchadnezzar's pleas for assistance.

7–10 :

The nations listed correspond to modern Iran, Syria, southern Turkey, Lebanon, Israel, Palestine, Jordan, and Egypt.

8 :

Esdraelon, formerly Jezreel (Judg 6.33 ), the great plain cutting across Palestine just north of Mt. Carmel.

9 :

Samaria, the region between the plain of Esdraelon and Judea.

11 :

Afraid, fear (of enemies or of God) is a frequent motif ( 2.28; 4.2; 5.23; 7.4; 8.8; 11.17; 14.3,7,19; 15.2; 16.10,15,16 ).

1.12–16 :Nebuchadnezzar vows revenge upon the western nations and alone defeats Arphaxad.

12 :

The two seas possibly denotes the Red and the Mediterranean.

  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result
Oxford University Press

© 2015. All Rights Reserved. Privacy policy and legal notice