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The New Oxford Annotated Bible New Revised Standard Study Bible that provides essential scholarship and guidance for Bible readers.

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Commentary on 2 Chronicles

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1.1–17 : Solomon takes charge, journeys to Gibeon, and prospers.

The Israel Solomon encounters is unified and unhampered by internal factions or strife. Solomon's legitimacy is stressed by repeated references to him as David's rightful successor and king by divine choice (1 Chr 17.11; 23.1; 28.6; 29.23–25; 2 Chr 1.1; 6.10; 7.17–18 ). The Chronicler presents the United Monarchy as the time when Israel's authoritative institutions took shape. The idealized presentation of David and Solomon effectively establishes a model by which later periods are judged.

1 :

Solomon ruled ca. 968–928 BCE. When Solomon took office, he immediately established himself in his kingdom and enjoyed the LORD's blessings (v. 1 ). There was no need to pacify, eliminate, or exile his domestic foes (1 Kings 1–2 ) because David had already consolidated domestic support for Solomon (1 Chr 23–29 ).

2–13 :

Along with the support of David and Solomon, the support of military, local, and civil officials enables the nation to embark on ma jor new initiatives in a harmonious fashion (1 Chr 11.1–3; 13.1–4; 23.1–2; 28.1; 29.1–25 ). In this case, the author transforms a story about Solomon's private pilgrimage to the high place at Gibeon (1 Kings 3.3–15 ) into a national pilgrimage, adding that the tent of meeting (see Ex 38–39 ) was located at Gibeon (1 Chr 16.39–42 ). This type of addition, which explains away problematic aspects of an earlier text, typifies Chronicles.

4 :

See 1 Chr 13; 15 .

5 :

On Bezalel and the bronze altar, cf. Ex 27.1–2; 31.1; 1 Chr 2.20 . The emphasis here is on continuity.

11–12 :

The divine gifts of unprecedented wisdom and knowledge, as well as riches, possessions, and honor set the tone and tenor of Solomon's reign.

14–17 :

These verses, drawn from 1 Kings 10.26–29 , illustrate that God's promises to Solomon at Gibeon are being realized. The rearrangement of earlier sources is typical of the Chronicler.

15 :

The Shephelah, the foothills between the coastal plain and the Judean hill country.

16 :

Kue, in Cilicia, in southern Asia Minor.

17 :

A shekel weighed about 11.5 gr (.4 oz). The kings of the Hittites ruled over northern Syria; Aram was southern Syria.

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