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The New Oxford Annotated Bible New Revised Standard Study Bible that provides essential scholarship and guidance for Bible readers.

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Commentary on 1 Chronicles

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10.1–14 : The demise of Saul.

Verses 1–12 are parallel to 1 Sam 31.1–13 . Of the many incidents in Saul's career, the Chronicler presents only the last—the story of Saul's death, assuming that the reader is generally familiar with the earlier part of the story from 1 Samuel. The evaluation of Saul's reign—the Chronicler's own addition—plays on both the Heb roots “mՙ1” (“to be unfaithful, disobedient”; see 1.9 ) and “dršs” (“to seek out, consult”), which are key terms in Chronicles. Saul dies because of his infidelity, even consulting a necromancer (1 Sam 28.3,7–25 ). Consultation with mediums to obtain contact with the dead is forbidden in legal texts (Lev 19.31; 20.6,27; Deut 18.11 ) and condemned in at least one prophetic text (Isa 8.18–19 ). This addition typifies the Chronicler, who must find in his sources a clear theological cause for each disaster.

4–5 :

Uncircumcised, unlike most of their contemporaries in the Near East, the Philistines did not practice circumcision. Fell on his sword, suicide is infrequent in the Bible; see 2 Sam 17.23; 1 Kings 16.18 ; and, in the New Testament, Mt 27.5 .

6 :

All his house died, a generalization, ignoring the continuing genealogy of Saul (cf. 8.33–40; 9.35–44 ).

10 :

Dagon, a Canaanite god of grain, adopted by the Philistines as one of their principal deities.

11–12 :

Jabesh‐gilead, in 1 Sam 11 , Saul is acclaimed king after his rescue of this city east of the Jordan from Ammonite oppression.

14 :

As elsewhere in Chronicles, the choice of kings belongs to God (e.g., 28.2–5; 29.10–12 ).

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