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The Access Bible New Revised Standard Bible, written and edited with first-time Bible readers in mind.

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Commentary on Joshua

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1.1–9 :

The LORD commissions Joshua.

2 :

Joshua is to move westward across the river in order to give Israel possession of the land (v. 6 ).

3 :

To walk over land was a way of legally claiming it.

4 :

The idea that the land of promise extends to the river Euphrates reflects Deut 11.24 and royal ideology (Ps 72.8 ).

5 :

The LORD as divine warrior * promises Joshua military success (see v. 3 ) and a supportive presence (v. 9 ).

7–8 :

The theology reflects Deuteronomy: Undeviating obedience to the book of the law produces prosperity and success. Joshua is to be like the ideal king of Deut 17.18–20 .

1.10–18 :

Joshua commands the people.

11 :

These three days are concluded by 3.2 .

12–15 :

These tribes have already occupied land east of the Jordan. The command of Moses is reported in Deut 3.18–20 . Rest (vv. 13, 15 ) is security in the land established by defeat of the enemy ( 21.44; 23.1 ).

17–18 :

The eastern tribes agree with enthusiasm, but their double use of only introduces some tension into the plot. Will the LORD be with Joshua? Will Joshua be strong and courageous?

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