We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more
Select Bible Use this Lookup to open a specific Bible and passage. Start here to select a Bible.
Make selected Bible the default for Lookup tool.
Book: Ch.V. Select book from A-Z list, enter chapter and verse number, and click "Go."
:
OR
  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result

The Access Bible New Revised Standard Bible, written and edited with first-time Bible readers in mind.

Related Content

Commentary on Hebrews

Previous
Jump to: Select book from A-Z list, enter chapter and verse number, and click "Go."
Next
Text Commentary side-by-side

1.1–14 .

1–4 :

Jesus' excellence. Hebrews celebrates Jesus' past and future.

1–2 :

Jesus enjoyed power to create, and in the future he will be heir of all things.

3 :

As reflection and imprint, Jesus shares all that God is, especially eternity.

5–14 :

Scripture says. Jesus' excellence is demonstrated by a chain of biblical citations applied to him.

5 :

Ps 2.7 and 2 Sam 7.14 declare Jesus' relationship to God as Son to Father.

6–7 :

Deut 32.43 asserts that heavenly angels acknowledge Jesus' exalted status.

8–9 :

Jesus is even called God according to Ps 104.4 because of his eternity: forever and ever.

10–12 :

Scripture declares Jesus' divine character in terms of past eternity and future imperishability; his past eternity is noted: in the beginning (Ps 102.25–27 ). Because uncreated, Jesus will have no end. Created things, like clothing, wear out, but Jesus will remain and always be the same.

13–14 :

The application of Ps 110.1 to Jesus confirms his exalted role as seated at the right hand of God ( 1.3 ) and being superior to angels ( 1.4 ).

  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result
Oxford University Press

© 2014. All Rights Reserved. Privacy policy and legal notice