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The Access Bible New Revised Standard Bible, written and edited with first-time Bible readers in mind.

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Commentary on Esther

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16.1–24 :

The text of the edict. Since Esther was given authority to draft the edict ( 8.8 ), the lavish praise of the king may be Esther's strategic stroking of the king's ego rather than his own boasting.

5–9 :

The king accepts responsibility only for being insufficiently careful about his “friends.”

10 :

Haman is revealed as a Macedonian, not really a Persian. Alexander the Great, who overthrew the Persian empire, was Macedonian, suggesting a political motive for Haman's plot.

15 :

The very laws that were seen as problematic in 13.4 are here lauded as righteous.

16 :

Elsewhere in the Bible foreign rulers appeal to the God of Israel (Ezra 1.2 ).

17 :

The king advises people not to observe the letters sent by Haman, though they came in his own name (ch. 13 ).

24 :

The threat of uninhabitable land, even hateful to wild animals, is a common curse in the ancient Near East.

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