We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more
Select Bible Use this Lookup to open a specific Bible and passage. Start here to select a Bible.
Make selected Bible the default for Lookup tool.
Book: Ch.V. Select book from A-Z list, enter chapter and verse number, and click "Go."
:
OR
  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result

The Access Bible New Revised Standard Bible, written and edited with first-time Bible readers in mind.

Related Content

Commentary on Esther

Previous
Jump to: Select book from A-Z list, enter chapter and verse number, and click "Go."
Next
Text Commentary side-by-side

1.1–9 :

In the royal court.

1 :

Ahasuerus is usually identified with Xerxes 1 (486–465 BCE). “Satrapies” is the more usual description of Persian administrative units than provinces. One hundred twenty-seven does not correspond to any reckoning known outside the Bible.

2 :

Susa, at the foot of the Zagros mountains, was one of three royal residences. It consisted of a citadel, or fortified city (enclosed with gates), and an unfortified lower city.

3 :

Media was a large province of the Achaemenid Persian empire.

4–8 :

The extended period of banqueting, as well as the extensive list of furnishings, paints a picture of a lavish, extravagant gentile * (non-Jewish) court.

9 :

Vashti is not mentioned in Persian literature. Although the Greek historian Herodotus reports that Persian men and women banqueted together, Vashti's separate banquet explains to the reader why she must be summoned, and the heavy drinking of the all-male audience may suggest the danger Vashti faced in appearing before them.

1.10–22 :

Vashti refuses.

10 :

Throughout the book, eunuchs (royal servants, often castrated) bridge gaps between men and women, royals and commoners, insiders and outsiders.

12 :

The author gives neither the reason for Vashti's refusal nor a judgment on her decision. The king was enraged: Ahauserus (and later Haman) has a quick temper.

13–19 :

The importance and permanence of Persian laws are themes of the book. As elsewhere, the king does not make his own decisions but defers to advisers and documents. Memucan the eunuch, not the king, makes the Vashti affair into a forum on women's subordination.

19 :

While biblical tradition indicates that Persian law could not be altered (Dan 6.8 ), such a strategy would have been impractical.

22 :

In its own language: The Persians generally accepted the ethnic diversity of their kingdom.

  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result
Oxford University Press

© 2014. All Rights Reserved. Privacy policy and legal notice