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The Access Bible New Revised Standard Bible, written and edited with first-time Bible readers in mind.

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Commentary on 2 Chronicles

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Commentary spanning earlier chapters

21–5a(2 Chr 36.22–23; Ezra 1.1–3 a):

The proclamation of Cyrus. The last two verses of 2 Chronicles and the first two verses and part of the third verse of Ezra say the same thing in almost identical words. This kind of repetition is called a doublet. Even though 1 Esdras is closely following the language in Chronicles and Ezra, the writer does not reproduce this doublet. This has led a number of scholars to propose that the books of Chronicles and at least part of the book of Ezra once comprised the Chronicler's history of Israel, from which the writer of 1 Esdras took his version.

2 :

The author believes Cyrus was divinely inspired.

Chs. 1–9 :

These chapters emphasize the success of Solomon as king over Israel. They attribute that success to Solomon's careful fulfillment of all that David had planned, particularly with regard to the Temple * and the conduct of proper worship. One of the basic points made in this section is that the Temple is the result of the combined efforts of David and Solomon. The Chronicler closely follows his source in 1 Kings 1–11 , but by selective editing and rearranging, he creates his own distinctive understanding of Solomon's importance.

1.1–17 :

Solomon's wisdom. This section sets the stage for the following narratives, * which develop Solomon's concern with building the Temple. *

1 :

Solomon son of David established himself in his kingdom: It is not clear when the Chronicler understood this to be happening; he may conceive of Solomon's sacrifice occurring just after David's death.

2 :

Solomon summoned all Israel: The community is unified in worship.

3 :

The high place * that was at Gibeon: In 1 Kings 3 , Solomon's going to Gibeon was viewed negatively since the Deuteronomistic * Historian saw any worship center outside of Jerusalem as heretical. For the Chronicler, Gibeon is the place where the tabernacle * and the altar of burnt offering are situated, and going there to worship is thereby acceptable.

10 :

Give me now wisdom and knowledge to go out and come in before this people is a rephrasing of the Chronicler's source (1 Kings 3.9 ), where Solomon requests wisdom to know good and evil in order to be able to govern. In this rephrasing, Solomon is asking for wisdom to know how to conduct his life as king, a broader goal.

13 :

So Solomon came from the high place at Gibeon: The Chronicler leaves out the narrative in his source (1 Kings 3.16–28 ) of Solomon's deciding between two prostitutes claiming the same child. In Kings, the story illustrates how Solomon's wisdom allows him to discern where justice lay and how to execute it. Since the Chronicler sees Solomon's wisdom as leading him to build the Temple, such a powerful story would be distracting.

15 :

The king made silver and gold as common in Jerusalem as stone: The overview of Solomon's achievements serves to confirm how shrewdly he could conduct himself.

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