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The Access Bible New Revised Standard Bible, written and edited with first-time Bible readers in mind.

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Commentary on 1 Chronicles

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2.1–4.23 :

The tribe of Judah and the line of David. The Chronicler writes from a Judean perspective, emphasizing the events of the southern kingdom as though they were decisive for the larger fate of “all Israel.” Accordingly, the lineage of the tribe of Judah and the line of David were of special concern. Their priority for the author is apparent by their placement first in the lineage of Israel.

2.4 :

His daughter-in-law Tamar also bore him Perez alludes to the narrative * in Gen 38 where Tamar must seduce Judah by deceit to gain her legitimate rights. David comes from the “Perez” line of the clan. *

7 :

The sons of Carmi: Achar, the troubler of Israel: Carmi was a descendant of Zerah's line. Achan (for which the Chronicler uses Achar) appears in Josh 7.1–26 , where he violates the command to destroy all the possessions of the inhabitants of Jericho. The notice of Zerah's line may have brought to the author's mind the incident with Achar. Troubler is a Hebrew pun, a word sounding similar to Achar (see Jn 7.24 ).

2.9–24 .

10 :

Nahshon, prince of the sons of Judah: The term for “prince” (Heb., “nasi”) had a variety of meanings in antiquity. Nahshon may be described in this way to highlight the line of David, since Nahshon's sister married Moses' brother Aaron (Ex 6.23 ) and thus helped form the primary line of Israel's priesthood. Such a connection would tie the royal and priestly family lines together.

13 :

Jesse became the father of: The narrative posits ten generations from Judah to Jesse, directly tying the ancestry of David's father to a founder of the nation.

21 :

Machir father of Gilead: The genealogies * use the term “father” to refer to a person or family lineage that made up a portion of the population of a specific place.

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