We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more
Select Bible Use this Lookup to open a specific Bible and passage. Start here to select a Bible.
Make selected Bible the default for Lookup tool.
Book: Ch.V. Select book from A-Z list, enter chapter and verse number, and click "Go."
:
OR
  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result

The Catholic Study Bible A special version of the New American Bible, with a wealth of background information useful to Catholics.

Related Content

Commentary on First Peter

Jump to: Select book from A-Z list, enter chapter and verse number, and click "Go."
Next
Text Commentary side-by-side

1, 1–2 :

The introductory formula names Peter as the writer (but see Introduction). In his comments to the presbyters ( 5, 1 ), the author calls himself a “fellow presbyter.” He addresses himself to the Gentile converts of Asia Minor. Their privileged status as a chosen and sanctified people makes them worthy of God's grace and peace. In contrast is their actual existence as aliens and sojourners, scattered among pagans, far from their true country.

1, 1 :

Dispersion: literally, diaspora; see Jas 1, 1 and Introduction to that letter. Pontus … Bithynia: five provinces in Asia Minor, listed in clockwise order from the north, perhaps in the sequence in which a messenger might deliver the letter.

1, 3–5 :

A prayer of praise and thanksgiving to God who bestows the gift of new life and hope in baptism (new birth, 3 ) through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead. The new birth is a sign of an imperishable inheritance ( 4 ), of salvation that is still in the future (to be revealed in the final time, 5 )

1, 6–9 :

As the glory of Christ's resurrection was preceded by his sufferings and death, the new life of faith that it bestows is to be subjected to many trials ( 6 ) while achieving its goal: the glory of the fullness of salvation ( 9 ) at the coming of Christ ( 7 ).

1, 10–12 :

The Spirit of Christ ( 11 ) is here shown to have been present in the prophets, moving them to search, investigate, and prophesy about the grace of salvation that was to come ( 10 ), and in the apostles impelling them to preach the fulfillment of salvation in the message of Christ's sufferings and glory ( 12 ).

1, 13–25 :

These verses are concerned with the call of God's people to holiness and to mutual love by reason of their redemption through the blood of Christ ( 18–21 ).

1, 13 :

Gird up the loins of your mind: a figure reminiscent of the rite of Passover when the Israelites were in flight from their oppressors (Ex 12, 11 ), and also suggesting the vigilance of the Christian people in expectation of the parousia of Christ (Lk 12, 35 ).

1, 14–16 :

The ignorance here referred to ( 14 ) was their former lack of knowledge of God, leading inevitably to godless conduct. Holiness ( 15–16 ), on the contrary, is the result of their call to the knowledge and love of God.

1, 19 :

Christians have received the redemption prophesied by Isaiah (52, 3), through the blood (Jewish symbol of life) of the spotless lamb (Is 53, 7.10; Jn 1, 29; Rom 3, 24–25; cf 1 Cor 6, 20 ).

1, 22–25 :

The new birth of Christians ( 23 ) derives from Christ, the imperishable seed or sowing that produces a new and lasting existence in those who accept the gospel ( 24–25 ), with the consequent duty of loving one another( 22 ).

1, 23 :

The living and abiding word of God: or, “the word of the living and abiding God.”

  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result
Oxford University Press

© 2015. All Rights Reserved. Privacy policy and legal notice