We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more
Select Bible Use this Lookup to open a specific Bible and passage. Start here to select a Bible.
Make selected Bible the default for Lookup tool.
Book: Ch.V. Select book from A-Z list, enter chapter and verse number, and click "Go."
:
OR
  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result

The Oxford Bible Commentary Line-by-line commentary for the New Revised Standard Version Bible.

Dating.

Three different strategies can be used to date 2 Peter. First, its relationships with other texts: it must post-date several of Paul's letters (therefore after 60 CE), and 1 Peter and the Jude-like source (whose dates are disputed), but predate the Apocalypse of Peter (thus before 130 CE). The second strategy, locating it within a model of the development of Christianity, suggests closer to 60 than 130 CE: Hellenistic expressions (e.g. 1:4, 13–14 ) can be paralleled in first-century Jewish texts, there is no promotion of church order, ‘your apostles’ ( 3:2 ) suggests a time before ‘apostle’ was used only for the twelve founders of the church universal (cf. 1 Cor 9:2; 2 Cor 8:23; Phil 2:25 ; Didache, 11.3–6), and the opponents are more similar to those in Corinth in the 50s than to second-century Gnostics. The third strategy focuses on two particular passages: 3:4 and 3:15–16 . In 3:4 the scoffers claim that the promise of ‘his coming’ has failed: ‘the fathers’ (NRSV, ‘our ancestors’) have died yet life continues as before. This points to bewilderment among Christians as the founding generation of the church died prior to the Lord's expected return (alluded to, perhaps, in e.g. Mk 9:1; 13:30 ). By, say, 120 CE this would be an outdated issue. However, concern over the death of ‘the fathers’ would have grown from the 50s onwards (cf. 1 Thess 4:13–18; Jn 21:23 , and the redaction of Mk 9:1 in Mt 16:28 ǀǀ Lk 9:27 ). Nevertheless, if ‘since the fathers died’ means that all the generation had died, after 80 CE seems most likely. 3:15–16 refer to Paul's letters being twisted as are ‘the other scriptures’. This bracketing of Paul's letters with ‘the scriptures’ implies that they were seen as divinely inspired ( 3:15 , ‘wisdom given to him’), but not necessarily ‘canonical’. Since Paul referred to his own words as (conveying) the inspired words of God (1 Thess 2:13; 1 Cor 2:13; 14:37–8; cf. 1 Pet 4:11 ) and ordered that they be read in the churches (Col 4:16; 1 Thess 5:27 , cf. reading of the Jewish Scriptures), 3:15–16 would be feasible during Paul's lifetime, though it is suggestive of a later period. However, the reference to Paul merely as a ‘dear brother’ is in marked contrast to the exalted epithets he received in 1 Clem. 47.1 and later texts. Overall, these approaches point towards the period 60–130 CE, with some reason to favour 80–90 CE.

  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result
Oxford University Press

© 2017. All Rights Reserved. Privacy policy and legal notice