We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more
Select Bible Use this Lookup to open a specific Bible and passage. Start here to select a Bible.
Make selected Bible the default for Lookup tool.
Book: Ch.V. Select book from A-Z list, enter chapter and verse number, and click "Go."
:
OR
  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result

The Oxford Bible Commentary Line-by-line commentary for the New Revised Standard Version Bible.

Israel and Edom.

The relations between Judah and Edom were turbulent over a long period, yet there was a strong note in the patriarchal traditions of their relatedness. Here, and elsewhere, Esau and Jacob are depicted as brothers (Bartlett 1977 ). David is said to have subdued Edom (2 Sam 8:12 ). There is a record of their successful rebellion in the time of Jehoram in the ninth century BCE (2 Kings 8:20–2 ). Some early conservative scholars dated Obadiah to this occasion (e.g. Keil 1866; von Orelli 1893 ). The Chronicler records Edom as taking advantage of pressure on Ahaz in the eighth century (2 Chr 28:16–19 ). A sense of betrayal by Edom when the Babylonians invaded Judah and captured Jerusalem in 586 BCE is marked in some exilic and post-exilic literature, e.g. Ps 137:7, Lam 4:21 . A considerable number of commentators have assigned Obadiah to this occasion, usually dating it shortly after the event (e.g. Rudolph 1971; Weiser 1974; Allen 1976 ). Later, the Edomites were subject to pressures from the incursions of the Nabateans and were pushed up into the region of the Negeb, a region therefore later known as Idumea. Some scholars have dated Obadiah to this time in view of the (future, as they see it) threat to Edom in vv. 1c–10 and especially the reference about being ‘driven to the border’ by her enemies (v. 7 ). So e.g. Wellhausen (1892); Bewer (1911 ). Wellhausen's suggestion that Obadiah might be ‘commentary’ on Mal 1:2–5 is interesting. For a detailed history of Edom and the Edomites see Bartlett (1989 ), and for the place of Edom in the biblical literature see Dicou (1994 ). The fact is, as has been said, that the text is not detailed enough to locate its historical context, and we have to allow for a development of the text in which material that once related to one situation is found to have relevance and force in others, and in which the lessons of one incident are found to have more general and even universal significance.

  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result
Oxford University Press

© 2017. All Rights Reserved. Privacy policy and legal notice