We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more
Select Bible Use this Lookup to open a specific Bible and passage. Start here to select a Bible.
Make selected Bible the default for Lookup tool.
Book: Ch.V. Select book from A-Z list, enter chapter and verse number, and click "Go."
:
OR
  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result

The Oxford Bible Commentary Line-by-line commentary for the New Revised Standard Version Bible.

The Book and its Redaction.

1.

Probably most of the book of Hosea goes back to the prophet himself, his words having been first gathered together either by himself or his disciples. The book is in the form of poetic oracles apart from the two narratives about Hosea's marriage in 1:2–9 and 3:1–5 , and the introductory and concluding verses 1:1 and 14:9 . The third-person narrative in ch. 1 clearly betrays the hand of an editor. The book falls into two broad sections, chs. 1–3 relating to the prophet's marriage and what it symbolized for Israel, and chs. 4–14 , which contain oracles of judgement (and later salvation) for Israel. Chs. 4–14 may have some broad chronological basis for their ordering.

2.

After the fall of Samaria Hosea's words were preserved and edited in Judah. A first stage of redaction was added, probably sometime after 700 BCE, indicating that unlike Israel, Judah was still faithful and would be preserved ( 1:7; 11:12b ). Then, either after or just before the fall of Judah in 586, a few glosses were added proclaiming that Judah too would fall because of its sins. Hosea's original words of judgement were thus given a new lease of life by being applied specifically to the southern kingdom ( 4:15a ; 5:5b ; 6:11a ; 10:11b ; 12:2a ). Other glosses envisage a future united kingdom of Judah and Israel under a Davidic monarchy, clearly betraying a Judean outlook (Hos 3:5; cf. 1:10–2:1 , esp. 1:11 ), and were presumably added in the sixth century or later. Other additions are the superscription ( 1:1 ), believed to derive from Deuteronomistic circles; 11:10c , predicting the return of the western exiles, an idea surprising in the eighth century; and the Wisdom-type saying concluding the book in 14:9 . It has occasionally been supposed that passages expressing future hope for northern Israel after judgement in Hosea are also later editorial additions, and not authentic to the prophet himself. However, the passages do not stand out awkwardly like the happy ending in Amos or the pro- and anti-Judean glosses in Hosea itself. (For some different ideas on the redaction of Hosea see Emmerson 1984 .)

3.

The Hebrew text of Hosea has often been thought one of the most corrupt in the OT. Nowadays, the amount of emendation thought necessary is less than was often believed in the past. However, we should not go to the other extreme, like Macintosh (1997 ), who avoids emendation at all costs.

  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result
Oxford University Press

© 2020. All Rights Reserved. Cookie Policy | Privacy Policy | Legal Notice