We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more
Select Bible Use this Lookup to open a specific Bible and passage. Start here to select a Bible.
Make selected Bible the default for Lookup tool.
Book: Ch.V. Select book from A-Z list, enter chapter and verse number, and click "Go."
:
OR
  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result

The Oxford Bible Commentary Line-by-line commentary for the New Revised Standard Version Bible.

Ancient Versions.

1.

The ancient concerns about the legitimacy of what appears in the received Hebrew text of Esther gave rise to a series of six midrashic supplements to the book that appear in the Septuagint version of the late second or early first century BCE. Those Greek Additions, lettered A to F, are interspersed throughout the book (see ch. 42 , Esther (Greek)). They were placed together at the end of the canonical book, however, in the fourth century CE by Jerome in his revision of the Old Latin translation. English translations today place those Additions in the Apocrypha, although recent Roman Catholic editions integrate them with the Hebrew Esther.

2.

The Septuagint text of Esther, with its additions as well as its omission of the many repetitive words and phrases of the MT, is probably the final stage in a complex process of tradition formation in which two component tales (one about Mordecai, another about Esther) were gradually brought together and elaborated in three successive stages of the Hebrew text (the latest being virtually identical with the present MT), and then the Septuagint stage. This last stage is faithful to the content of the Hebrew but less so to the wording (Moore 1971: lxi–lxiv; see also Clines 1984 and Fox 1990 ). Esther also exists in another ancient Greek version (the Lucianic recension, or A-text). The Vulgate and Syriac translations are both based on the Hebrew and are quite close to it, although Jerome's translation is a little freer than in most other parts of his work. Two Aramaic translations are quite expansive.

  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result
Oxford University Press

© 2020. All Rights Reserved. Cookie Policy | Privacy Policy | Legal Notice