We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more
Select Bible Use this Lookup to open a specific Bible and passage. Start here to select a Bible.
Make selected Bible the default for Lookup tool.
Book: Ch.V. Select book from A-Z list, enter chapter and verse number, and click "Go."
:
OR
  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result

The Jewish Study Bible Contextualizes the Hebrew Bible with accompanying scholarly text on Jewish traditions and history.

Flesh Made Word and the Body as Text

There is no escaping the incarnational implications of the esoteric identification of Torah and the name, since the latter is the divine essence, a point made explicitly in several zoharic passages ( 2:60b, 87a, 90b, 3:13b, 19a, 21a, 35b–36a, 73a, 89b, 98b, 159a, 265b, 298b ) and confirmed by other kabbalists contemporary with the Zohar, for instance, Gikatilla. Thus, in one zoharic passage we read, “It has been taught that the holy One, blessed be He, is called Torah” ( 2:60b ). In a second passage, the matter is laid out in more detail based on the symbolic correspondence between the ten commandments revealed at Sinai, which contain the whole Torah, and the ten divine utterances, the emanations comprised within the Tetragrammaton (YHVH):

The Torah is the name of the holy One, blessed be He. Just as the name of the holy One, blessed be He, is inscribed in ten utterances so Torah is inscribed in ten utterances; these ten utterances are the name of the holy One, blessed be He, and the Torah is entirely one name, verily the holy name of the holy One, blessed be He.…The one who is meritorious with respect to Torah is meritorious with respect to the holy name. R. Jose said that he is indeed meritorious with respect to the holy One, blessed be He, because He and His name are one ( 2:90b ).

The Castilian kabbalists whose views are preserved in the zoharic homilies make even more explicit the assumption of their predecessors. The equation of Torah and the name implies that God is embodied in Torah and, consequently, engagement in study and fulfilling the commandments serve as the means by which one is conjoined to the divine. In the words of another zoharic homily: “He who is occupied with Torah it is as if he were occupied with the holy One, blessed be He, for Torah is entirely the name of the holy One, blessed be He” ( 3:89b ). But how can we speak of God being embodied in the text? Can light that is without limit be contained in letters that are limited by their very shape? The mystery that is basic to zoharic kabbalah (though by no means unique to its fraternity) is that God is absent from the text in which God is present, since for God to be present in the text God must be absent.

  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result
Oxford University Press

© 2020. All Rights Reserved. Cookie Policy | Privacy Policy | Legal Notice