We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more
Select Bible Use this Lookup to open a specific Bible and passage. Start here to select a Bible.
Make selected Bible the default for Lookup tool.
Book: Ch.V. Select book from A-Z list, enter chapter and verse number, and click "Go."
:
OR
  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result

The Jewish Study Bible Contextualizes the Hebrew Bible with accompanying scholarly text on Jewish traditions and history.

New Prayers

One of the trends that was typical of the Jewish communities of the land of Israel in the pre‐Crusader period was to follow up references to past events in the Jewish religious experience with hopes for similar developments in the future. Although such a liturgical expansion met with the opposition of those authorities who preferred the prayers to deal with one discrete theme at a time, it was broadly adopted in a number of instances, and in those cases the hope for the ideal future was tied to the citation of a biblical verse that predicted it. Examples are to be found in the various rites at the conclusion of the geʾulah (redemption) benediction before the ʿAmidah, the relevent verse being Ps. 147.2 . Where novel prayers were introduced into the liturgy in the late medieval and early modern period, biblical verses were added to them in order to give them a more authentic flavor and an additional degree of authority. In the case of the prayer for the secular ruler, use was made of Pss. 144.10; 145.13; Isa. 43.16; and Jer. 23.6 , but a glance at the total original contexts of each of these verses reveals an emphasis on God's supreme power and the ultimate kingdom of David rather than on their temporal, secular equivalents.

The English Chief Rabbinate's prayerbook of 1890 included a number of new prayers for such events as childbirth, charity collection, the house of mourning, and taking up residence in a new house, as well as some for young children to recite. All of these were richer in psalms and other scriptural quotations than they were in traditional liturgical phraseology. The same philosophy was adopted by those in the progressive movements when they formulated new pieces of liturgy for events and circumstances that had previously lacked them. Twentieth‐century prayers introduced in communities of various religious hues for the State of Israel and its Defense Forces, though less biblically dominated, also incorporate such verses as Deut. 20.4 and 30.3–5, and the last part of Isa. 2.3. Here too, the earlier tension between subservience to biblical quotations and the use of newer liturgical language and forms is evident. The clear indication, however, is that the biblical quotation, though by no means ubiquitous, continues to be indispensable.

Addendum: Some Liturgical Uses of Psalms in Jewish Tradition

  • Ps. 1: unveiling of tombstone

  • Ps. 3: recitation of the Shema before going to sleep

  • Ps. 6: vv. 2–11 are in Taḥanun

  • Ps. 8: daily evening service

  • Ps. 15: dedication of a new house; unveiling of a tombstone

  • Ps. 16: funeral; unveiling; in a house of mourning

  • Ps. 19: introductory prayers (pesuqei de‐zimra) in the morning service for Sabbath and festivals

  • Ps. 20: daily morning service

  • Ps. 23: for the sick; funeral; unveiling

  • Ps. 24: psalm for Sunday; on festivals when the Torah is returned to the Ark

  • Ps. 27: from 1 Elul through Hoshana Rabbah

  • Ps. 29: Friday evening service; on Sabbath when the Torah is returned to the Ark

  • Ps. 30: introductory prayers for the daily, Sabbath, and festival morning service; dedication of a new house

  • Ps. 33: introductory prayers for the Sabbath and festival morning service

  • Ps. 34: introductory prayers for the Sabbath and festival morning service

  • Ps. 39: house of mourning

  • Ps. 47: before the blowing of the shofar (ram's horn) on Rosh Ha‐Shanah

  • Ps. 48: psalm for Monday

  • Ps. 49: house of mourning; funeral

  • Ps. 63: consecration of a cemetery; funeral

  • Ps. 67: evening service at the conclusion of Sabbath

  • Ps. 81: psalm for Thursday

  • Ps. 82: psalm for Tuesday

  • Ps. 83: daily morning service when Taḥanun is recited

  • Ps. 90: introductory prayers for the Sabbath and festival morning service

  • Ps. 91: recitation of the Shema before going to sleep; before going on a journey; introductory prayers for the Sabbath and festival morning service

  • Ps. 92: Friday evening service; introductory prayers for the Sabbath and festival morning service

  • Ps. 93: psalm for Friday; Friday evening service; introductory prayers for the Sabbath and festival morning service

  • Ps. 94: psalm for Wednesday

  • Ps. 95–99: Friday evening service

  • Ps. 100: introductory prayers for the daily morning service

  • Ps. 102: consecration of a cemetery

  • Ps. 103: for the sick; consecration of a cemetery

  • Ps. 104: new moon; Sabbath afternoon service (fall and winter); consecration of a cemetery

  • Ps. 113–118: Hallel on new moon, festivals, and Hanukkah

  • Ps. 120–134: Sabbath afternoon service (fall and winter)

  • Ps. 126: introduction to grace after meals on Sabbath and festivals

  • Ps. 130: morning service of Ten Days of Repentance

  • Ps. 135–136: introductory prayers for the Sabbath and festival morning service

  • Ps. 137: introduction to grace after meals on weekdays

  • Ps. 139: for the sick

  • Ps. 144: evening service at the conclusion of Sabbath

  • Ps. 145–150: introductory prayers for the daily, Sabbath, and festival morning service

[STEFAN C. REIF]

  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result
Oxford University Press

© 2017. All Rights Reserved. Privacy policy and legal notice