We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more
Select Bible Use this Lookup to open a specific Bible and passage. Start here to select a Bible.
Make selected Bible the default for Lookup tool.
Book: Ch.V. Select book from A-Z list, enter chapter and verse number, and click "Go."
:
OR
  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result

The Jewish Study Bible Contextualizes the Hebrew Bible with accompanying scholarly text on Jewish traditions and history.

Hallel

Tracing in the rabbinic prayerbook the fate of other pieces of Scripture that have a Jewish liturgical history going back for at least two millennia may also be profitable for seeing the overall picture. Although the word “Hallel” does occur with reference to other biblical passages, its oldest liturgical definition relates to the recitation of Pss. 113–118. Such a collection of Scripture is reported by the Mishnah to have been part of the Temple ritual during the offering of the paschal lamb (Pes. 10.6–7). Whether or not the custom is, from a critical, historical perspective, as ancient as Temple times, it was incorporated into the domestic ritual on the first night of Passover in post‐Temple times, and the nature of its recitation is the subject of early rabbinic discussion. Three teachers from the tannaitic period compared its declamation with that of the Song at the Sea (Exod. ch 15 ), namely, responsively by prayer‐leader and community, but each had a different concept of the precise form taken by such an exchange (Mekhilta of R. Ishmael on Exod. 15.1 ). Such a fluidity of view about the precise nature of the recitation of Hallel had its equivalent in the later rules about its use in the standard prayers. In spite of its more than respectable origins, it was limited to certain festivals, and even then with an abbreviated format for the new moon. Even with regard to the first night (or, according to some rites, first two nights) of Passover, some communities incorporated it into the synagogal services while others restricted it to domestic use in the Haggadah (the Exodus story and exposition recited at home, at the Passover seder). It was, however, important enough for a benediction to be formulated (perhaps not in early talmudic times) to precede and to follow it and, consequently, for some of the 19th‐century Reform prayerbooks to allow its retention as a biblical passage but without such a benediction.

  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result
Oxford University Press

© 2019. All Rights Reserved. Cookie Policy | Privacy Policy | Legal Notice