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The Jewish Study Bible Contextualizes the Hebrew Bible with accompanying scholarly text on Jewish traditions and history.

Medieval Additions

It was decided that when the worshippers entered the synagogue, they should recite verses from such sources as Num. 24.5 (“How fair are your tents, O Jacob”) and Pss. 5.8 (“I, through Your abundant love, enter Your house”), 26.8 (“O LORD, I love Your temple”), 55.15, 69.14, and 95.6. Similarly, biblical verses were added when the Torah scroll was taken out of the Ark for public reading, and when it was returned to the Ark. Some of these verses did not even appear in the text of the prayerbook until well after the invention of printing. The most common of these on a weekday were Num 10.35 (“Advance, O LORD”) and Isa. 2.3 (“Come, Let us go up to the Mount of the LORD”) before the biblical reading, and Ps. 148.13–14 (“Let them praise the LORD”) and Num. 10.36 (“Return, O LORD”) after it. Among other verses introduced in connection with the synagogal use of the Torah scroll were Pss. 86.8 and 132.8–10, Prov. 4.2 and 3.16–18, Lam. 5.21, and Deut. 4.35 . Many of these make no direct reference to the Torah (e.g., Prov. 4.2 , “I give you good instruction”), but were understood by postbiblical Judaism as referring to the Torah. Later (more voluntary) additions to the conclusion of the formal service were the Binding of Isaac (Gen. ch 22 ) and the Manna (Exod. ch 16 ). One of the contributions of the early modern mystics was to champion the recitation of the entire Song of Songs as an introduction to Friday evening prayers and to follow that by the recitation of Pss. 95–99 and 29 and of Prov. 31.10–31 before the Sabbath meal. The early Reform movement was more attached to biblical passages than to rabbinic texts, and they consequently removed the rabbinic benedictions that talmudic tradition had attached to the reading of the lectionaries and to the recitation of such items as Hallel.

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