We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more
Select Bible Use this Lookup to open a specific Bible and passage. Start here to select a Bible.
Make selected Bible the default for Lookup tool.
Book: Ch.V. Select book from A-Z list, enter chapter and verse number, and click "Go."
:
OR
  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result

The Jewish Study Bible Contextualizes the Hebrew Bible with accompanying scholarly text on Jewish traditions and history.

The Early Prayerbooks

In the early prayerbooks, therefore, the introduction of the morning prayers by the recitation of Pss. 145–150 (called the pesukei dezimra, or “biblical verses of praise”), a custom known in earlier times, was not the only use of that biblical book. Sets of psalms made up of such chapters as Pss. 19, 33–34, 90–93, 98, 100, 121–124, and 135–136 came to be added, in different groupings according to the various rites, for use on Sabbaths and festivals. Catenae (“chains” or selections) of verses were similarly used to preface the central liturgy. They included late biblical passages from 1 Chron. chs 16 and 29 and from Neh. ch 9 , as well as from a variety of Torah, prophetic, and Kethuvim books. They were often strung together by a common theme such as God's salvation and protection or His gifts, including the revelation of the Torah. As the prayerbook and the synagogal ritual became progressively more formalized in the high and later Middle Ages, other biblical texts were introduced. An examination of the earliest known versions of the “grace after meals,” for instance, reveals that some rites were eager to conclude the body of each benediction with a biblical verse while others preferred to restrict the content to rabbinic formulations. In later texts of the same prayer, the passages appended to the final benediction include a significant number of biblical verses, especially at the conclusion.

Conscious as they were of these tendencies and of the need to stress that rabbinic Judaism was not in any sense rejecting the Bible in favor of the Talmud, leading scholars such as Saadia ben Joseph, the rabbinic leader (gaon) in the 10th‐century Babylonian center of Sura, and Maimonides, his counterpart in 12th‐century Cairo, made statements on the matter. Saadia (in his introduction to the Siddur) attempted to demonstrate that all the rabbinic prayers were merely formulations of liturgical genres that already appeared in the Bible. Maimonides, for his part, argued (in his code, Mishneh Torah) that it was only because the Jewish people's knowledge of Hebrew had deteriorated severely after the Babylonian Exile that they could no longer be left to their own liturgical devices, but had to be guided by being provided with rabbinic structures. Thus, these two leading authorities set about merging the two major sources of Judaism, the Bible and the Talmud, in theological terms, just as this had been achieved by practical religious custom in the ritual context.

  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result
Oxford University Press

© 2018. All Rights Reserved. Privacy policy and legal notice