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The New Oxford Annotated Bible New Revised Standard Study Bible that provides essential scholarship and guidance for Bible readers.

- Introduction to the prophetic books

IN BOTH THE JEWISH AND THE CHRISTIAN canons the prophetic books form a distinct section of the Bible. The two traditions differ, however, with respect to the number, sequence, and placement of the prophetic books. Jewish tradition divides the canon into three parts: the Torah (i.e., Genesis‐Deuteronomy), the Prophets, and the Writings. The term “Former Prophets” is used to designate the historical books Joshua‐2 Kings (perhaps reflecting a tradition that these books were written by prophets), and the term “Latter Prophets” is used for those books that bear the name of a particular prophet (i.e., Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and the twelve Minor Prophets). In Christian Bibles the prophetic books form the last section of the Old Testament canon, following the Pentateuch, the Historical Books, and the Poetical Books. Christian tradition includes Daniel among the prophetic books, in contrast to Judaism, which groups Daniel with the Writings. Also, Christian Bibles place Lamentations, which is not a book of prophecy, immediately after the book of Jeremiah, reflecting the tradition of the Septuagint (the ancient Greek translation of the Hebrew Bible) that Jeremiah was the author of Lamentations. Likewise, in some Christian canons, the Apocryphal/Deuterocanonical book of Baruch comes after Lamentations, because of the connection between the prophet Jeremiah and his scribe, Baruch. (See further pp. 453–58 ESSAYS.)

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