We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more
Select Bible Use this Lookup to open a specific Bible and passage. Start here to select a Bible.
Make selected Bible the default for Lookup tool.
Book: Ch.V. Select book from A-Z list, enter chapter and verse number, and click "Go."
:
OR
  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result

The Access Bible New Revised Standard Bible, written and edited with first-time Bible readers in mind.

The Letter Of James - Introduction

The author claims to be “James, servant of the Lord” and sends this generic letter to “the twelve tribes in the Dispersion.” Two issues need to be addressed. Despite tradition, scholars do not think that the author is the brother of Jesus (Mk 6.3 ) nor the overseer of the Jerusalem church (Acts 12.17; Gal 1.19 ). He writes fine Greek and uses rhetoric * impressively; he is well educated in Judean and biblical traditions and can translate Semitic expressions into plausible Greek. This type of literacy seems most unlikely for a Galilean peasant. He addresses the audience as “the twelve tribes in the Dispersion,” an identity that embraces the totality of the Christian church, just as Israel consisted of twelve tribes; the Christian Scriptures also consider the community as the new twelve tribes, who are governed by the twelve apostles * (Mt 19.28; Lk 22.30 ). No other letter claims such a wide audience; 1 Peter only spoke of the exiles dispersed in Asia Minor ( 1.1 ). Yet, although we cannot know for sure the identity of the author and the specific audience addressed, the document contains many items that resemble typical pieces of moral exhortation * in Greek writings.

  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result
Oxford University Press

© 2018. All Rights Reserved. Cookie Policy | Privacy Policy | Legal Notice