We use cookies to enhance your experience on our website. By continuing to use our website, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Find out more
Select Bible Use this Lookup to open a specific Bible and passage. Start here to select a Bible.
Make selected Bible the default for Lookup tool.
Book: Ch.V. Select book from A-Z list, enter chapter and verse number, and click "Go."
:
OR
  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result

The Access Bible New Revised Standard Bible, written and edited with first-time Bible readers in mind.

The Second Letter Of Paul to the Thessalonians - Introduction

Second Thessalonians, though lacking the personal tone of 1 Thessalonians, expresses strong concern for the community's survival. Prayers, exhortations * to discipline, explanations of suffering, and attention to the community's thoughts and deeds ( 1.11 ), all give it a tone of encouragement.

It is uncertain if Paul wrote the letter. In favor of his authorship are similarities with 1 Thessalonians: simple headings (1 Thess 1.1; 2 Thess 1.2 ); repeated thanksgivings (1 Thess 1.2; 2.13; 3.9; 2 Thess 1.3; 2.13 ); and prayers (1 Thess 3.11; 2 Thess 2.16 ) following thanksgivings (1 Thess 3.9; 2 Thess 2.13 ). In addition, both letters rely on belief in the approaching end time. Yet these very similarities lead some interpreters to ask why Paul would want to imitate himself so closely in a second composition. Moreover, an end-time perspective is the ground of hope in 1 Thessalonians (1 Thess 4.13–18 ), while the ground of certainty in 2 Thessalonians is a certain authorized body of knowledge (see the emphasis on traditions in 2 Thess 2.15; 3.6 ). The need to authenticate and differentiate itself from other, non-genuine letters ( 3.17 ) is the strongest argument against Paul's authorship (that effort would not be necessary while an author remained alive). If the letter was not written by Paul, we cannot be certain about its time of composition.

Whoever wrote it, the letter encourages steadfastness, refutes enthusiasts, and commends true teaching as the church awaits the coming of Jesus. The letter refutes some members for spreading inaccurate information about the day of the Lord ( 2.1–12 ); others (or perhaps the same persons) are rebuked for refusing to work. The community, awaiting God's vindication, is commended for its firm grasp on “the truth” ( 2.10 ), the apostolic * tradition, in which it will witness effectively to others.

  • Previous Result
  • Results
  • Look It Up Highlight any word or phrase, then click the button to begin a new search.
  • Highlight On / Off
  • Next Result
Oxford University Press

© 2020. All Rights Reserved. Cookie Policy | Privacy Policy | Legal Notice